Increase Font Size Option 5 Reset Font Size Option 5 Decrease Font Size Option 5
Home | Food | Groceries | Buy Cheap Groceries: 7 Ways - Three More
Got Opinions? facebook_16 Facebook twitter_16 Twitter RSSRSS
 
Buy Cheap Groceries: 7 Ways - Three More Print E-mail
(19 votes, average 3.79 out of 5)
Food - Groceries
Written by livecheap staff   
Thursday, 08 July 2010 03:13
Article Index
Buy Cheap Groceries: 7 Ways
Three More
All Pages

5. Avoid Grocery Spoilage

Saving money just doesn' happen in the grocery store. If you load up on a bunch of cheap deals and save 30% and turn around and have 30% food spoilage, you've saved nothing. Buying in bulk has its downside. That 20 pound pickle jar seemed like a good deal in Costco, but 6 months later, they don't taste so good when you're only 1/3rd done. Buy what you’re going to eat and store it properly. It's fine if you buy in bulk but buy those things that last and make sure you do a weekly inventory and plan your meals to use everything that you have.

Related Article: Reduce Grocery Spoilage

 

6. Stock Up When Cheap

Going too lean on your food supply can backfire hugely. If the fridge is empty you might end up paying $50 to go out to dinner...enough for most families to eat for a few days. Your greatest asset is your pantry - use it and stock it with ingredients that are easy to fix and take a long time to spoil. 2 billion people live on little more than rice and so can your family along with a host of other low cost and healthy foods. Think canned goods, grains, and boxed treats.  Buying groceries cheap, stock up, and don't run out.

Related Article: Cheap Groceries for Your Pantry

7. Read Grocery Ingredients

Make sure what you are buying is the real deal. If you think you are buying maple syrup and end up soaking your panakes with corn syrup flavored with a "touch" of maple, you're getting ripped off. Same thing for fake juices with fancy names. Food manufacturers are masters of sleight of hand when it comes to what's really in the package. Read the ingredients and you and your family will thank you for it. If you don't trust the manufacturer or understand the ingredients, don't buy the product.

Related Article: Avoid Grocery Rip-Offs: Read the Label

 

By following these lessons, you'll buy groceries cheaper.  Some people manage to cut their grocery bills in half without giving up a single calorie.  Just try it for a month and come back to us for more ways to cut down the cost of the food on your table. Bon appetit.

 

Want to Learn How to Live Better and Cheaper?

Get our Famous 5 Rules of Living Cheaply today! You'll get over 20 pages of great content for free with full access to our Cheap University.

Get Your Cheap Score! Find out how cheap you really are today by answering these questions.


 

Like this article? Share it on Facebook or more!

Twitter! Facebook! Del.icio.us! Digg! Google! Yahoo! Reddit! Mixx! Live! StumbleUpon!


Comments
Add New RSS
+/-
Write comment
Name:
Email:
 
Website:
Title:
 
Please input the anti-spam code that you can read in the image.
beachboui  - Are You Nutz?! |2012-01-24 15:06:11
"Just as happy with fake syrup..." ????
Do you care nothing about your family's health?

That fake syrup is nearly 100% high fructose corn syrup. HFCS is one of the leading causes of the the obesity epidemic we face in America. It is NOT the same as real maple syrup and is NOT digested the same in your digestive process. Don't take my word for it. Look it up.

HFCS has been perpetrated on the consuming public by food a processing industry that has NO conscience and does't care about the harm their products do, as long as it makes them wealthy.

Saving a couple of bucks by feeding your family garbage will take a toll on your family's health, and cost you more money in the long run. What is your family's health worth?

Saving $2 on cheap syrup now is foolish, short term gratification, in my view.

Spending a little more for healthier options and being aware of the evil ingredients in many processed foods, with a focus on long-term gratification will pay much, much large dividends. They just won't be obvious at the check out.

(These comments are MY opinion, and don't necessarily reflect the opinions of this website.)
beachboui  - Are You Nutz?! |2012-01-23 14:37:12
"Just as happy with fake syrup..." ????
Do you care nothing about your family's health?

That fake syrup is nearly 100% high fructose corn syrup. HFCS is one of the leading causes of the the obesity epidemic we face in America. It is NOT the same as real maple syrup and is NOT digested the same in your digestive process. Don't take my word for it. Look it up.

HFCS has been perpetrated on the consuming public by food a processing industry that has NO conscience and does't care about the harm their products do, as long as it makes them wealthy.

Saving a couple of bucks by feeding your family garbage will take a toll on your family's health, and cost your more money in the long run.

Saving $2 on cheap syrup now is foolish, short term gratification.

Spending a little more for healthier options and being aware of the evil ingredients in many processed foods, with a focus on long-term gratification will pay much, much large dividends. They just won't be obvious at the check out.

(These comments are MY opinion, and don't necessarily reflect the opinions of this website.)
Misty La Mont |2010-12-13 18:08:30
#6 I used coupons to help me stock my panrty. I made a list of 30-45 meals that my family enjoys, listing all the ingredients. Multiply by 6 and I astock up using a combinaton of great sales and coupons. A peak into my freezer 4 turkeys, 4 hams, 10 whole chickens, 30 misc chicken, 50 packages ground hamburger turkey or pork. 100 bags of frozen vegetables, misc yogurts at least 20 butter or margarine, and 50 frozen juice concentrate. In dry goods 20 cases of vegetables, 6 cases of fruit 50 boxes of cereal. Okay lets just say it looks more like a grocery store. I feed a family of 6 and 8 other children every meal and snacks during the day. I hardly ever run to the store to get anything in a pinch.
Misty |2010-12-13 17:55:31
I started couponing 3 months ago and what a diffrence it has made in my food budget. I have a family of 6, plus I babysit children out of my home. My grocery budget was about $1,000 a month. $200 for cleaning toiletries. With the use of coupons food $600, cleaning $100. I set a buy price and stick with that I try not to pay full price for any thing. I combine sales with coupons to get the best price possible. You tube is were I learned the basics, asked a few questions at the service desks of the stores I shop most at. I am not embarassed if anything I want to show others how to save as much as I do. My time is worth the $700 I am saving every month. Give it a try you just might have fun and enjoy all the money you are saving. My weekly savings are being put into an emergency account. Plus the stock pile of food and esentials Its a great peace of mind.
haverwench |2010-07-08 12:00:11
Regarding #7: Unless, of course, your family is just as happy with the fake maple syrup as with the real stuff. In that case, why pay extra? Premium food is kind of like premium gas: not worth the money unless your car (or your sophisticated palate) actually needs it.

As for coupons, I think it's worth mentioning that it does cost you something to get the coupons in the first place. If you don't already subscribe to the Sunday paper, it's unlikely that you will recoup the cost of the paper with coupon savings--especially if you use mostly store brands, as recommended in #1. Unless you can manage to "stack" your coupon with a good sale, name-brand products usually cost more even with a coupon. This is why I generally find coupons to be the least effective of all cost-saving strategies, and I will never pay for access to coupons.
Bonnie |2010-07-08 13:54:08
It costs us $1 a week to get the Sunday paper. I cut coupons on things that I would be interested in if they were in my price range - regularly, the store will have this item on clearance, or on sale, and then they make my coupon worth $1, and I end up saving $20-$30 regularly. If by chance you still don't want to buy a paper, many coupons can be found online at sites like coupons.com, redplum.com, smartsource.com, and don't forget the coupons on the Target website which you can pair with manufacturer's coupons for an even better deal. :)
frugal nomad  - I'll go for the Sunday Paper |2010-07-08 15:54:44
The Sunday Paper is always a good read. It has value in and of itself. Add to that all the coupons and you can't go wrong. How else are you going to find out about big sales. Aside from your junk mail - which can also be a good place to look for deals.

So, we'll cast our vote for the Sunday Paper. We actually wrote an article listing 10 reasons you can't live without the Sunday paper. Maybe its worth a second look.

http://www.livecheap.com/shopping/everything-else/327-10-cheap-reasons -you-cant-live-without-the-sunday-paper
frugal nomad  - Fake maple syrup is fine |2010-07-08 15:58:36
As long as you're paying not paying the price of real maple syrup. You do tend to get what you pay for; but that doesn't mean paying for something you think is real only to find out it's a doctored imitation.
beachboui  - Are You Nutz?! |2012-01-23 14:34:45
"Just as happy with fake syrup..." ????
Do you care nothing about your family's health?

That fake syrup is nearly 100% high fructose corn syrup. HFCS is one of the leading causes of the the obesity epidemic we face in America. It is NOT the same as real maple syrup and is NOT digested the same in your digestive process. Don't take my word for it. Look it up.

HFCS has been perpetrated on the consuming public by food a processing industry that has NO conscience and does't care about the harm their products do, as long as it makes them wealthy.

Saving a couple of bucks by feeding your family garbage will take a toll on your family's health, and cost your more money in the long run.

Saving $2 on cheap syrup now is foolish, short term gratification.

Spending a little more for healthier options and being aware of the evil ingredients in many processed foods, with a focus on long-term gratification will pay much, much large dividends. They just won't be obvious at the check out.
 
Joomla Templates by Joomlashack